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Police officer who allowed stolen cash to be laundered through his bank is dismissed from Met Police

July 2, 2019

DISMISSED: PC Robert Carter's career is in tatters after he allowed his mother to launder cash through his bank (PA) 

A POLICE officer, who allowed more than £100,000 of stolen funds to be laundered through his bank account, has been dismissed from the Met Police and is unlikely to work in law enforcement again.

PC Robert Carter, 33, based at Tower Hamlets Borough, in east London, was found to have permitted his mother to launder around £126,000 stolen funds through his bank account.

Carter allowed mother Tamara Carter, 49, to launder the money that she stole from her employer.

Mrs Carter, from Claydon, Suffolk, was jailed for four years in September 2017 for pilfering £859,000 while working as a personal assistant at Whittinghame Property Investments between 2008 and 2014.

She spent the cash on Mulberry designer handbags and lavish holidays to Australia and Dubai.

Mr Carter also benefited financially from the arrangement and spent up to £46,000 of the money.

A Met Police spokesman said: "PC Carter also failed to inform the relevant authorities that he was aware of substantial funds being transferred through his bank account by his mother.

"He also failed to manage/control his bank account to avoid suspicion of being involved in criminal conduct.

"It was alleged that Police Constable Carter had breached the standards of professional behaviour in relation to honesty and integrity and discreditable conduct."

A Met Police misconduct panel found all allegations proven as gross misconduct at the hearing held in November. 

Yesterday, the panel gave a sanction of dismissal without notice.

Essex News and Investigations has asked the Met if Mr Carter was facing any criminal action over money laundering.

A spokeswoman said an evidence file was sent to the CPS but it found insufficient evidence for a criminal conviction.

 

 

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